Chess Notes By Edward Winter

chessa game played on a chessboard by two people who maneuver sixteen pieces each according to rules governing movement of the six kinds of pieces (pawn, rook, knight, bishop, queen, king), the object being to bring the opponent’s king into checkmate.

Such games have a positive impact on individuals. As you coordinate between the hand and eyes, the games increase your reasoning power and concentration as well. Every game is designed keeping in mind the type of audience. It is mandatory to abide by the ratings for the benefit of the users’ understanding about the game.

It means they can move anywhere along a straight line and stop wherever you want. On a subsequent turn, they can change direction, but still move in a straight line up to where you decide to stop. Source: page 137 of Dynamic Chess by R.N. Coles (London, 1956). In the 1966 Dover edition, the passage is on page 135.

Anand blinked, understandably, at this point. He could have taken the pawn; several hours of cool analysis with computer engines suggests that the pawn grab should work. In practice, white’s optical compensation is immediately obvious, and Anand said he reckoned it would be full compensation. White smashes the pawn structure and starts hitting weaknesses on the light-squares and along the e-file. Arcane tactical calculations suggest black can get on top anyway in the slugfest that will follow, but those lines cannot be seen or judged accurately by a human being with limited time on the clock.

Then recently, about a few months ago, I discovered that some simple concepts that I never really took into consideration seriously really could make a difference in my gameplay. Sure enough, I improved tremendously. I am currently enjoying a 15+ winning streak at chess and I am now able to beat regular guys at the free Internet chess server – something I could never do before my discovery.

More than learning how to make good moves, getting better at chess is about learning how to not make bad moves. You can play solid chess for 30 or 40 moves, and then make one bad move and lose the game. The quality of your other moves may not have made a difference in your game, but the bad move certainly does. To prevent these bad moves, we have to overcome weaknesses in understanding, and we need to learn them so well that we will recognize them when the situations arise in game play.

In a controversial move, Hou Yifan, often referred as the Queen of Chess,” said her intentional resignation from the game was meant to protest having been paired against mostly female players at a major tournament where male contestants dramatically outnumbered female.